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IndyWatch Victorian News Feed was generated at Melbourne VIC IndyWatch.

Thursday, 23 November

04:12

The Andrews/CFMEU Victorian Government has an anti-corruption commission with some spare capacity "IndyWatch Feed National"

The Daniel Andrews/CFMEU Victorian Government has an anti-corruption commission (I know, I laughed too). You may decide over the next day or so that you have evidence of a couple of matters the Commission might take an interest in. You can make a report by clicking on the link above....

01:25

Platforms & ladders "GroovUs Feed Anews"

Taking the gas

Construction work done came in at a thunderous $61.8 billion for the third quarter, the highest on record, with the result again skewed higher by the import of an LNG platform.


Drilling into the engineering construction figures, if you'll pardon the pun, we can see the enormous spike in Western Australia largely relating to an imported LNG platform, sending total engineering construction a massive 68.4 per cent higher than a year earlier. 

Notably engineering work is also rising strongly in New South Wales and Victoria on the back of strength in infrastructure projects, with Queensland also now on a decent run in this regard.


Flats falling flat

Despite the record high quarterly result, residential construction is now in moderate decline, with the value of detached house building done sliding for three consecutive quarters.

Looking specifically at the building of attached dwellings such as apartments, work done is still absolutely flying in New South Wales, but is now declining in Victoria, and dropping very sharply in Queensland (down 22 per cent since the end of last year, and falling).

...

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Wednesday, 22 November

16:35

Meet the November 2017 Melbourne Changemakers "GroovUs Feed Anews"

We have 8 excited changemakers - a diverse range of social organisations with real business problems. Come along to our Melbourne Hackathon Nov 25-26 (this weekend!):

Carers Couch

After her personal journey caring for a friend with cancer, Martina Clark created Carers Couch providing information, education, advice and assistance that increases carers capacity and resilience. Many carers just don't get a break; emotional burnout, depression, anxiety and chronic illness are common and impact the overall mortality of carers. Self-care is crucial in preventing this but due to high workload and lack of support. In a role that no one applies for, carers currently lack resources and support that are centralised. Building on her personal experiences as a carer as well as running the current Carers Couch site,  Martina hopes that the hack weekend will help her deliver this information and support all in one place.

Care to Compare?

care to compare.png

When Roberto Pietrobon isnt working in corporate partnerships for the Stroke Foundation hes working on his project Care to Compare. The project aims to provide online health insurance comparisons that capture the profits of health insurance referrals to provide funding to health charities. Having already hacked with RHoK in June, as well as work ongoing work since, Roberto is excited for both UXers and backend developers who might be interested in helping to realise the Care to Compare concept.

Berry Street

...

15:23

BATTS Announces New EP 62 Moons "GroovUs Feed Anews"

Image Courtesy of BATTS Melbourne based singer-songwriter BATTS this week announced that shes signed to the newly announced THAA Records and will be releasing her new EP 62 Moons on the 29th November. The EP features BATTS 2017 singles For Now and Little White Lies and cements her new stripped back sound. The album was []

13:20

Westall research - this blog's contribution to the debate. "IndyWatch Feed National"

Introduction

From time to time, I receive comments from people, that they believe I have a negative approach to the subject of the 6 April 1966, mass sighting at Westall, Melbourne, Australia.

I inform such people that, like themselves, I have the right to my opinion as to the cause of the sighting that day. Unlike some individuals, I base my own opinion on having conducted research on the event. I was not there on the day, and ultimately, my opinion is based solely on what I have been able to find out, by communicating with Westall witnesses as long ago as the 1990's; by visiting the site, prior to the playground installation; by an examination of all the original source material I could locate; an examination of Australian government files; by looking for potential non-UFO explanations; by exploring topics such as memory recall in people; and applying all that I have learnt from many years of interviewing witnesses to sightings, all over Australia.

One of the few witness documents available from 1966 - image courtesy VFSRS

This blog's contribution to the Westall debate

Quite a few posts on this blog, have explored the Westall sighting. I have provided the following links for anyone who wishes to explore material relating to the event; much of which, you will not find anywhere else.

...

12:44

The model is broken.. Damn the Matrix

This amazing article was originally published here.

IS SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT A MYTH?

For a long time now, sustainable development has been the fashionable economic objective, the Holy Grail for anyone aiming to achieve economic growth without inducing catastrophic climate degradation. This has become the default position for two, very obvious reasons. First, no politician wants to tell his electorate that growth is over (even in countries where, very clearly, prosperity is now in decline). Second, policymakers prepared to invite ridicule by denying the reality of climate change are thin on the ground.

Accordingly, sustainable development has become a political article of faith. The approach seems to be to assume that sustainable development is achievable, and use selective data to prove it.

Where this comfortable assumption is concerned, this discussion is iconoclastic. Using the tools of Surplus Energy Economics, it concludes that the likelihood of achieving sustainable development is pretty low. Rather, it agrees with distinguished scientist James Lovelock in his observation that sustainable retreat might be the best we can expect.

This site is dedicated to the critical relationship between energy and economics, but this should never blind us to the huge threat posed by climate change. There seems no convincing reason to doubt either the reality of climate change science or the role that emissions (most obviously of CO) are playing in this process. As well as counselling sustainable retreat, James Lovelock might be right, too, in characterising the earth as a system capable of self-regeneration so long as its regenerative capabilities are not tested too far.

False comfort

Economics is central to this debate. Here, comparing 2016 with 2001, are some of the figures involved;

Real GDP, 2016 values in PPP dollars:

2001: $73 trillion. 2016: $120tn (+65%)

Energy consumption, tonnes of oil equivalent:

2001: 9.5bn toe. 2016: 13.3bn toe (+40%)

Emissions of CO, tonnes:

2001: 24.3bn t. 2016: 33.4bn t (+37%)

If we accept these figures as accurate, each tonne of CO emissions in 2001 was associated with $2,990 of GDP. By 2016, that number had risen to $3,595. Put another way, 17% less CO was emitted for each $1 of GDP. By the same token, the quantity of energy required for each dollar of GDP declined by 15% over the same period.

This is the critical equation supporting the plausibility of sustainable growth. If we have really shown that we can deliver successive reductions in CO emissions per dollar of GDP, we have options.

One optio...

08:16

Chin Chin employees hit back at wage theft "IndyWatch Feed National"

This account of working in one of Melbournes most iconic restaurants, draws attention to the need for urgent action put an end to this practice, which is widespread in the hospitality industry. The owner of Chin Chin operates nine restaurants and is in the process of opening another one. Go to Megaphone link to sign the petition. The following was written by Sorcha Harrop, one of the central figures in this story.

For almost a year I worked at Chin Chin, one of Melbournes hottest restaurants. I worked through breaks, battled stress, exhaustion and was underpaid at least $9,500.

My experience is just one of thousands of disgusting wage theft stories hospo workers are forced to regularly endure.

Ive had enough of being screwed over. Thats why I filmed this video calling on Malcolm Turnbull to take wage theft off the menu.

Chin Chin is famous for its no reservations policy, long queues down the street, fabulous food and outstanding service.

What you dont know about Chin Chin is that the people who make it such a hot destination are forced to do 14-hour long days and work up to 20 hours a week for free. And heres the kicker: while I was getting underpaid thousands of dollars, my boss, restaurant king Chris Lucas, was spending millions building his seventh restaurant.

This is textbook wage theft. And its happening to hospo workers everywhere: a new survey shows 76% of hospitality employers are stealing workers pay.

We are fed up, and enough is enough. If youve had enough of wage theft too, please watch and share this video.

Every year hundreds of thousands of hospo workers in Australia are robbed: paid below minimum wage, refused penalty rates, and forced to do free work.

We all know stealing is wrong. These rigged rules make wage theft so easy its now become a business model.

Stand with me and other hospo workers getting ripped off.

Hospo workers deserve respect just like everybody else its time to stand up and demand we are treated fairly and paid what were owed.

Video from United Voice

&

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Tuesday, 21 November

18:51

5:30pm Fri 24 Nov |Rally for Manus: End the Siege Bring Them Here Refugee Action Collective (Vic)

When: 5:30pm Friday 24th November Where: State Library of Victoria, 328 Swanston St, Melbourne. Facebook event here WEEKLY RALLY & SIT IN FOR MANUS REFUGEES End the Siege -Bring Them Here Recurring rally, every Friday from 5.30pm, State Library Followed by march and street sit in speakers include Aziz live from Manus, Adnan Abdulkarim, Ahwaz(...)

17:16

Post collapse, just what will we eat..? Damn the Matrix

Further to my post where I explained how Australias poor soils are largely incapable of growing much more than meat, this article landed in my news feed

Heres a list of what Australian farmers produce:

  • Each year, on average each Australian farmer feeds 600 people.
  • Agriculture powers 1.6 million Australian jobs.
  • Australian farmers manage 48 per cent of the nations landmass.
  • Cattle, wheat and whole milk are our top three commodities by value.
  • More than 99% of Australias agricultural businesses are Australian owned.
  • Out of the $58.1 billion worth of food and fibre Australian farmers produced in 2015-16 77 per cent ($44.8 billion) was exported. 
  • 6.8 million hectares of agricultural land has been set aside by Australian farmers for conservation and protection purposes.
  • Australian farmers are among the most self-sufficient in the world, with government support for Australian farms representing just 1% of farming income. In Norway it is 62%, Korea 49%, China 21%, European Union 19% and United States 9%.

Farm facts by commodity

  • In total, Australian beef cattle farmers produce 2.5 million tonnes of beef and veal each year. Australians eat an average 26kg of beef per person, per year. 
  • Australians consume an average of 45.3kg of chicken meat per person, per year. This not only cements chickens position as Australian consumers favourite meat, but also makes Australia one of the largest consumers of chicken meat in the world!
  • In a normal year, Australias cotton growers produce enough cotton to clothe 500 million people.
  • Australia produces about 3 per cent of the worlds cotton but is the fifth largest exporter, behind the USA, India, Brazil, Uzbekistan.
  • Australian dairy farmers produce 9,539 million litres of whole milk per year with the farmgate value of milk production being $4.3 billion.
  • On average, each Australian eats 3.08kg of dried fruit per year. Total Australian dried fruit exports in 201516 totalled 5,000 tonnes and was valued at $19.4 million.
  • The Australian forestry, logging and wood manufacturing industry employs 64,300 in the forest products industry. At the end of 2010, 13,067 million tonnes of carbon was held in Australias forests and harvested wood products in service and in landfill. Almost all this carbon 12,841 million tonnes  98% was stored in living forest.
  • Australias grains industry accounts...

15:57

Ora Ora Shohei Otomo at Backwoods, Melbourne "GroovUs Feed Anews"

Son of the legendary Katsuhiro Otomo Japanese author, illustrator and creator of cult classic Anime AKIRA Shohei Otomo is cut from the same cloth as his father. With intense concentration, he produces ballpoint drawings of semi-imagined figures and situations, blending the old guard sensibilities and pop-culture of Japan with his own dystopian take on life in the country and the seedy underbelly often hidden from the outside world.

With an impressive display of technical precision, incisive political critique and innovative style, Otomo effortlessly slides between the boundaries of graphic design, fine art, anime and raw punk power.

Featuring a larger-than-life-size hand-painted Sumo sculpture, amongst other visual treats, Otomos show opens to the public at Backwoods, Melbourne, this Friday, November 24rd and runs until December 10th.

Backwoods Director and stalwart of the Melbourne art scene, Alexander Mitchell, penned the following essay on Otomos work for the show:

Japanese culture is engaged in an ongoing battle against two opponents; its youth and the West. Like a colossal Sumo wrestler with expert cultural judo, by using its opponents own weight as a weapon, Japan somehow keeps the fight in equilibrium. It rolls with each blow, assimilates culture, pushes back with its own creations and always finds balance.

...

14:14

Life expectancy. From 45 to 82 years, we've come a long way "GroovUs Feed Anews"

One hundred and fifty years ago on Tuesday The Sydney Morning Herald broke news that these days would be considered shocking.

The first 'life table' prepared for the British colony put the expected lifespan of a newborn non-Aboriginal Australian at just 45.6 years.

The Bureau of Statistics now gives newborns a lifespan of 82.5 years; 80.4 for boys, and 84.6 for girls.

And that's almost certain to be an underestimate. Improvements in medical technologies throughout 80 years of life are likely to add an extra four years to those totals.

On November 7, 1867, the life table was good news. We were better off than England where newborns got only 40.9 years, and better off than Belgium where they got 32.2.

And things were even better than the raw figure of 45.6 years suggested. An extraordinary 10.6 per cent of newborns (10.6 per cent of boys, 9.8 per cent of girls) died before they reached the age of one. If you survived to the age of one, you were likely to make it to 51.

From today's vantage point it looks as if life expectancy has always increased, but it hasn't, for decades at a time. The 1960s were what Melbourne University demographer Alan Lopez refers to as the "tobacco years". Life expectancy increased not at all.

For older Australians life expectancy scarcely increased for 50 years, between 1920 and 1970. It was only after 1972 when the tobacco use was brought under control (it didn't finally peak until 1978 - 1980) and progress was made against heart attacks that it began to grow again.

In recent years, newborns have been gaining an extra year of life every two and a half years. Australian National University demographer Liz Allen can't see an upper limit, although she concedes it will be more difficult. Controlling tobacco, preventing heart disease and making driving safer were easier to do than it would be to extend the lifespan of the parts of our bodies with built in obsolescence. Our bodies weren't designed to last too many years beyond childbirth, she says.

Alan Lopez says we've already harvested most of the low-hanging fruit. "The gains in lung cancer, chronic heart disease and the tobacco causes will continue, but at a much slower rate," he says. The gains from road accidents will depend on whether we adopt strict road rules of the kind Sweden has where there is a zero tolerance for alcohol.

At a public lecture to be presented at Melbourne University next week, he will suggest that life expectancy will continue to climb for the next 25 years, but at half the rate of the previous 25 years.

The biggest ob...

14:06

Better economic days ahead? Sorry, not yet "GroovUs Feed Anews"

Why do people feel so rotten?

It's because they don't believe the federal Treasurer when he says there are "better days ahead".

He's said it 25 times, roughly once a week since April.

If things were really looking up, retailers wouldn't need to cut prices to maintain sales. During the June and September quarters, retail prices fell 0.2 and 0.4 per cent. Fell. It's rare for prices to fall across the entire retail sector for an entire quarter. It's even rarer for them to fall for two consecutive quarters, and rarer still for them to fall that much. It's the biggest wave of discounting this century.

What did the price dive deliver? An increase in spending of 1 per cent. In department stores, where prices slipped 0.3 per cent, spending slid 2.2 per cent.

ShopperTrak monitors retail traffic in real time. Store owners and shopping centre managers feed it video, Wi-Fi and the output of heat sensors to enable it to work out how many people are in participating stores at any given time and how long they stay. In September, foot traffic was down 6 per cent on the same period the previous year. In the first three weeks of October, it was down 7.5 per cent.

It's partly because we're switching to shopping online, where, for big items, we can get lower prices, often from overseas. But it's also because, even with low and sliding prices, we are less keen to shop.

Ask us whether we expect better or worse conditions in the year ahead, as the Melbourne Institute does every month, and only 21 per cent say "better". That's the average for the past 12 months. Back in the final year of the Gillard government and the last months of the mining boom, 30 per cent said better. Back further in the last year of the Howard government, 33 per cent picked better.

It's the same when you ask about the next five years: only 21 per cent of us expect better times; 26 per cent expect worse. Back in the final year of the Howard government 44 per cent of us expected better times, and only 22 per cent expected worse.

Like businesses reluctant to invest whatever the interest rate, households that are wary will be reluctant to spend whatever the price. Officially, inflation is just 1.8 per cent, keeping pace with record low private sector wage growth of 1.8 per cent. But 1.8 per cent is an overestimate.

The Bureau of Statistics conceded as much on Monday when it revamped the consumer price index to take into account changed buying patterns. The index measures the price of the basket of goods that is said to represent the purchases of a typical consumer. But what's typical changes over time.

...

13:37

Pay your rates "GroovUs Feed Anews"

Here is an article from a Melbourne suburbs newspaper telling people to pay their 'rates' at the Municipal office.


13:01

#SanctionAustralia What Actions can international activists take? RISE: Refugees Survivours and Ex-detainees

1. Contact human rights and civil society groups within your region. Ask them to publicly sanction Australia for torture of refugees.
2. Pressure the UN to sanction Australia for refugee rights violations and from participating in any refugee/humanitarian and human rights decision making process.
3. Consistent presence at Australian embassies carrying Sanction Australia banners visibly!
4. Banner/ brochure Sanction Australia banner drops in busy areas and brochure distribution at any events
5. Presence at sporting and other other events Australia participates in.
6. Boycott any events sponsored by security companies or private firms who ran detention centres in Australia such Serco, Wilson Security, Broadspectrum, Ferrovial Servicios etc.

NOTE:
RISE has to authorize any fundraising events for the #SanctionAustralia Campaign.
Respect eX-detainees running this campaign at RISE. Make sure you acknowledge our labour and leadership

RISE eX-detainee Team.

10:41

AVN Founder and Vaccine-Activist promises to retire if Victorian Minister is vaccinated "IndyWatch Feed National"

Meryl Dorey, past-president and founder of the AVN, Australias national vaccine-safety consumer health lobby group, has called upon Jill Hennessy, Victorias Health Minister, to demonstrate that, There are no risks in vaccinating your children.

Read More

10:13

Wilkie backs push against parliament delay "GroovUs Feed Anews"

Independent MP for Dennison, Andrew Wilkie. Photo AAP

Independent MP for Dennison, Andrew Wilkie. Photo AAP

CANBERRA [AAP]

Crossbench MP Andrew Wilkie says the federal parliament has a moral imperative to sit next week as Turnbull government ministers line up to defend deferring the lower house session.

Labor has drafted a letter petitioning Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull to reverse his decision to postpone the House of Representatives sitting to December 4.

Victorian independent Cathy McGowan has confirmed she will not take part in any protest sitting, but her four crossbench colleagues are expected to co-sign Labors letter.

Their support would mean 73 MPs support the push the same number the government has on the floor of the house with Barnaby Joyce and John Alexander off fighting by-elections.

With numbers being that close surely theres a moral imperative if not a legal imperative on the prime minister agreeing that the parliament would sit next week, Mr Wilkie told ABC Radio.

Leader of the House Christopher Pyne said the delay would give the Senate time to pass the same-sex marriage bill and allow parliament to sort out the dual citizenship mess.

However, the announcement came just hours after Queensland LNP senator Barry OSullivan said up to four coalition MPs were considering breaking coalition ranks to vote for an inquiry into the banks.

Mr Pyne insisted the decision to delay the return of parliament had nothing to do with thwarting Labor or rogue government backbenchers mustering the necessary votes to launch an investigation into the banks.

Theres no motion or bill to establish a banking royal commission either before the Senate or the House of Representatives, he told ABC radio.

Treasurer Scott Morrison also played down the link but Opposition Leader Bill Shorten grabbed it with both hands.

There is no doubt in my mind that one of the reasons why Mr Turnbull has cancelled parliament next week is because he knows a banking royal commission is inevitable, Mr Shorten said.

And he will do everything he can d...

07:35

Brace for impact. Damn the Matrix

This piece is particularly interesting because its from someone who campaigns for the Scottish Greens. Hes also a scientist, so knows whats going on better than most politicians.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

ianbaxter

Ian Baxter

Politics will not save us from abrupt climate change because we dont want to be saved

Forty years ago I was studying for a Physics degree at Edinburgh University. I chose Edinburgh because it offered a course which included Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics, interests which have stayed with me since.

When I came across articles about the Greenhouse Effect, this intrigued me as a scientist, but also worried me as a human being, and although it was only a theory at the time, I felt the implications if true were so severe that at the very least, we should adopt the precautionary principle and take immediate action to prevent it.

It was this that led me to join the Ecology Party in 1979 and since then, politics for me has always been about climate change and the need to address it before it became unstoppable. In the seventies and eighties, the threat of an impending nuclear war was on everyones minds, but here was...

05:00

Traveling Illustrator Captures Londons Historic Pubs as Cut-Out Pen and Ink Drawings "GroovUs Feed Anews"

London Pub Illustrations Maxwell Tilse

The Blackfriar. Blackfriars.
This post may contain affiliate links. If you make a purchase, My Modern Met may earn an affiliate commission. Please read our disclosure for more info.

Earlier this year, we introduced you to London-based illustrator Maxwell Tilse, who combines his love of drawing with his passion for traveling. Originally from Sydney, Australia, the 23-year-old travels Europe, documenting each city he visits with beautifully detailed pen and ink sketches. Now, as he prepares to leave London after living there for two years, he has released a new series of cut-out drawings that depict the citys oldest pubs.

London is a city packed to the brim with historical wonders that are so easy to miss or pass by, unnoticed, says Tilse. From the wedge-shaped Black Friar built in 1875, to the quaint Georgian architecture of the The Bricklayers Arms in Fitzrovia, Tilse captures the essence of Londons most quintessentially English watering holesthe oldest being The Old George, which has been in business since 1713.

Approximately 5cm in height, Tilses little pubs feature charming details, such as stain glass windows, ornamental balconies, and Tudor style chimneys. I do love the mock Tudor architecture that's nestled in between the grand Victorian hotels and galleries, the artist admits. He finishes his process by photographing his work, held up beside the original building.

If you love Tilses work you can purchase prints via his Etsy shop. Keep up to date with Tilses illustrated travel journal on Instagram.

Illustrator Maxwell Tilse Captures Londons oldest pubs in a series of cut-out pen and ink drawings.

...

Monday, 20 November

22:14

Friends of Leadbeaters Possum Inc v VicForests November 17 2017 Friends of Leadbeater's Possum

The Possums Case

November 17 2017 Summary

Friends of Leadbeaters Possum Inc. v VicForests challenges whether the native forest logging industry can be held to account for its impact on federally listed species, when logging has not been conducted in accordance with the 20-year old Regional Forest Agreement (RFA) regime.

20 year Regional Forest Agreements across Australia

The case concerns the magnificent forests of Victorias Central Highlands which are home to the critically endangered Leadbeaters Possum and the Greater Glider, recently listed as vulnerable. It could have implications for other areas. At stake is native forest habitat on public land that is home to iconic wildlife.

Logging in public native forests is exempt from our national threatened species protection law, the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act, provided that the logging is carried out in accordance with an RFA, a commonwealth-state agreement. The RFA requires a performance review every five years.

We allege that failure to complete the required five-year reviews on time or at all, means that logging in certain areas which significantly impacts the Leadbeaters Possum and Greater Glider has not been and will not be in accordance with the RFA, and so is not exempt from the assessment and approval requirements of the EPBC Act that apply to such actions.

The Central Highlands RFA was signed on 27 March 1998 and the first 5-year review was due by 2003. However, the State and Federal governments say that they have only done one review, which they say looked at the period up to 2009 and concluded in 2015.

The first hearing in the case was held on Friday, 17th November before Justice Mortimer of the Federal Court.

Environmental Justic Australia

The outcome of Fridays hearing was orders from the Court for a hearing of a separate question relating to whether logging in the areas named in FLbPs claim which significantly impacts threatened species has not and will not be conducted in accordance with the RFA, and so is not exempt from the requirements of the EPBC Act, due to the failure to conduct the mandated 5 yearly reviews (the full text of the separate question can be read in the orders from Justice Mortimer see the link belo...

06:08

The War for Cash "IndyWatch Feed Economics.au"

Youve read about the War on Cash here the Daily Reckoning for years now. The idea has sprouted all sorts of variations and books around the world. Today Ill show you why its a false lead.

I think the world is in for a War for Cash, not a War on Cash. Well see a cash grab, not the abolition of paper money. Itll be a mad rush for cold hard currency the physical kind.

In the age of digitalisation, electronic payments using only someones phone number, and cryptocurrencies, this sounds a little odd. The thing is, we live in a real, tangible world. For now, anyway. And that means theres a gap between your life and the digital payments system. One that can widen into a chasm without any warning. Except the one youre reading now.

Many years ago, I moved to Melbourne for my first real job. (Flying trapeze gigs are more of a hobby.) To secure a flat, I had to come up with a bank cheque to pay the deposit. But my bank refused to give me one because my bank account was with their stockbroker division. The stockbroker account had all the benefits of a bank account for free and with higher interest. All the benefits except allowing bank cheques, that is.

If it hadnt been for a large wad of cash from an unexpected source, whom many of you know as a former editor of The Daily Reckoning, I wouldve missed out on the flat. Cash saved me when the digital banking system failed me.

Then came the great Australian bank failures. You might remember them. One after the other over a course of months, Australian banks had tech glitches that led to their ATM cash machines going down. People couldnt get money for a few hours each time. It caused quite a mess, especially for elderly people without updated payment cards.

This happened in a country thats very advanced when it comes to digital banking. And that was precisely the problem. Our overreliance on digital payment systems working.

Speaking of which, in India, the turmoil caused by going cashless was all over the newspapers. Vox summarised the mess:

One study, from the All India Manufacturers Organization, found that micro and small-scale industries showed a whopping 35 percent job loss and a 50 percent decline in revenue in just the first 34 days since the policy went into effect, and that those numbers are likely to continue to increase in coming months. Earlier this month, the International Monetary Fund said that Modis policy had caused India to lose its title as the worlds fastest-growing economy, after shaving a percentage point off its projection for Indias growth in 2016. Many of Indias small businesses that handle all their transactions in cash have facing crippling blows to their business.

The New York Times loo...

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