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IndyWatch Victorian News Feed was generated at Melbourne VIC IndyWatch.

Tuesday, 21 November

18:51

5:30pm Fri 24 Nov |Rally for Manus: End the Siege Bring Them Here Refugee Action Collective (Vic)

When: 5:30pm Friday 24th November Where: State Library of Victoria, 328 Swanston St, Melbourne. Facebook event here WEEKLY RALLY & SIT IN FOR MANUS REFUGEES End the Siege -Bring Them Here Recurring rally, every Friday from 5.30pm, State Library Followed by march and street sit in speakers include Aziz live from Manus, Adnan Abdulkarim, Ahwaz(...)

17:16

Post collapse, just what will we eat..? Damn the Matrix

Further to my post where I explained how Australias poor soils are largely incapable of growing much more than meat, this article landed in my news feed

Heres a list of what Australian farmers produce:

  • Each year, on average each Australian farmer feeds 600 people.
  • Agriculture powers 1.6 million Australian jobs.
  • Australian farmers manage 48 per cent of the nations landmass.
  • Cattle, wheat and whole milk are our top three commodities by value.
  • More than 99% of Australias agricultural businesses are Australian owned.
  • Out of the $58.1 billion worth of food and fibre Australian farmers produced in 2015-16 77 per cent ($44.8 billion) was exported. 
  • 6.8 million hectares of agricultural land has been set aside by Australian farmers for conservation and protection purposes.
  • Australian farmers are among the most self-sufficient in the world, with government support for Australian farms representing just 1% of farming income. In Norway it is 62%, Korea 49%, China 21%, European Union 19% and United States 9%.

Farm facts by commodity

  • In total, Australian beef cattle farmers produce 2.5 million tonnes of beef and veal each year. Australians eat an average 26kg of beef per person, per year. 
  • Australians consume an average of 45.3kg of chicken meat per person, per year. This not only cements chickens position as Australian consumers favourite meat, but also makes Australia one of the largest consumers of chicken meat in the world!
  • In a normal year, Australias cotton growers produce enough cotton to clothe 500 million people.
  • Australia produces about 3 per cent of the worlds cotton but is the fifth largest exporter, behind the USA, India, Brazil, Uzbekistan.
  • Australian dairy farmers produce 9,539 million litres of whole milk per year with the farmgate value of milk production being $4.3 billion.
  • On average, each Australian eats 3.08kg of dried fruit per year. Total Australian dried fruit exports in 201516 totalled 5,000 tonnes and was valued at $19.4 million.
  • The Australian forestry, logging and wood manufacturing industry employs 64,300 in the forest products industry. At the end of 2010, 13,067 million tonnes of carbon was held in Australias forests and harvested wood products in service and in landfill. Almost all this carbon 12,841 million tonnes  98% was stored in living forest.
  • Australias grains industry accounts...

15:57

Ora Ora Shohei Otomo at Backwoods, Melbourne "GroovUs Feed Anews"

Son of the legendary Katsuhiro Otomo Japanese author, illustrator and creator of cult classic Anime AKIRA Shohei Otomo is cut from the same cloth as his father. With intense concentration, he produces ballpoint drawings of semi-imagined figures and situations, blending the old guard sensibilities and pop-culture of Japan with his own dystopian take on life in the country and the seedy underbelly often hidden from the outside world.

With an impressive display of technical precision, incisive political critique and innovative style, Otomo effortlessly slides between the boundaries of graphic design, fine art, anime and raw punk power.

Featuring a larger-than-life-size hand-painted Sumo sculpture, amongst other visual treats, Otomos show opens to the public at Backwoods, Melbourne, this Friday, November 24rd and runs until December 10th.

Backwoods Director and stalwart of the Melbourne art scene, Alexander Mitchell, penned the following essay on Otomos work for the show:

Japanese culture is engaged in an ongoing battle against two opponents; its youth and the West. Like a colossal Sumo wrestler with expert cultural judo, by using its opponents own weight as a weapon, Japan somehow keeps the fight in equilibrium. It rolls with each blow, assimilates culture, pushes back with its own creations and always finds balance.

...

14:14

Life expectancy. From 45 to 82 years, we've come a long way "GroovUs Feed Anews"

One hundred and fifty years ago on Tuesday The Sydney Morning Herald broke news that these days would be considered shocking.

The first 'life table' prepared for the British colony put the expected lifespan of a newborn non-Aboriginal Australian at just 45.6 years.

The Bureau of Statistics now gives newborns a lifespan of 82.5 years; 80.4 for boys, and 84.6 for girls.

And that's almost certain to be an underestimate. Improvements in medical technologies throughout 80 years of life are likely to add an extra four years to those totals.

On November 7, 1867, the life table was good news. We were better off than England where newborns got only 40.9 years, and better off than Belgium where they got 32.2.

And things were even better than the raw figure of 45.6 years suggested. An extraordinary 10.6 per cent of newborns (10.6 per cent of boys, 9.8 per cent of girls) died before they reached the age of one. If you survived to the age of one, you were likely to make it to 51.

From today's vantage point it looks as if life expectancy has always increased, but it hasn't, for decades at a time. The 1960s were what Melbourne University demographer Alan Lopez refers to as the "tobacco years". Life expectancy increased not at all.

For older Australians life expectancy scarcely increased for 50 years, between 1920 and 1970. It was only after 1972 when the tobacco use was brought under control (it didn't finally peak until 1978 - 1980) and progress was made against heart attacks that it began to grow again.

In recent years, newborns have been gaining an extra year of life every two and a half years. Australian National University demographer Liz Allen can't see an upper limit, although she concedes it will be more difficult. Controlling tobacco, preventing heart disease and making driving safer were easier to do than it would be to extend the lifespan of the parts of our bodies with built in obsolescence. Our bodies weren't designed to last too many years beyond childbirth, she says.

Alan Lopez says we've already harvested most of the low-hanging fruit. "The gains in lung cancer, chronic heart disease and the tobacco causes will continue, but at a much slower rate," he says. The gains from road accidents will depend on whether we adopt strict road rules of the kind Sweden has where there is a zero tolerance for alcohol.

At a public lecture to be presented at Melbourne University next week, he will suggest that life expectancy will continue to climb for the next 25 years, but at half the rate of the previous 25 years.

The biggest ob...

14:06

Better economic days ahead? Sorry, not yet "GroovUs Feed Anews"

Why do people feel so rotten?

It's because they don't believe the federal Treasurer when he says there are "better days ahead".

He's said it 25 times, roughly once a week since April.

If things were really looking up, retailers wouldn't need to cut prices to maintain sales. During the June and September quarters, retail prices fell 0.2 and 0.4 per cent. Fell. It's rare for prices to fall across the entire retail sector for an entire quarter. It's even rarer for them to fall for two consecutive quarters, and rarer still for them to fall that much. It's the biggest wave of discounting this century.

What did the price dive deliver? An increase in spending of 1 per cent. In department stores, where prices slipped 0.3 per cent, spending slid 2.2 per cent.

ShopperTrak monitors retail traffic in real time. Store owners and shopping centre managers feed it video, Wi-Fi and the output of heat sensors to enable it to work out how many people are in participating stores at any given time and how long they stay. In September, foot traffic was down 6 per cent on the same period the previous year. In the first three weeks of October, it was down 7.5 per cent.

It's partly because we're switching to shopping online, where, for big items, we can get lower prices, often from overseas. But it's also because, even with low and sliding prices, we are less keen to shop.

Ask us whether we expect better or worse conditions in the year ahead, as the Melbourne Institute does every month, and only 21 per cent say "better". That's the average for the past 12 months. Back in the final year of the Gillard government and the last months of the mining boom, 30 per cent said better. Back further in the last year of the Howard government, 33 per cent picked better.

It's the same when you ask about the next five years: only 21 per cent of us expect better times; 26 per cent expect worse. Back in the final year of the Howard government 44 per cent of us expected better times, and only 22 per cent expected worse.

Like businesses reluctant to invest whatever the interest rate, households that are wary will be reluctant to spend whatever the price. Officially, inflation is just 1.8 per cent, keeping pace with record low private sector wage growth of 1.8 per cent. But 1.8 per cent is an overestimate.

The Bureau of Statistics conceded as much on Monday when it revamped the consumer price index to take into account changed buying patterns. The index measures the price of the basket of goods that is said to represent the purchases of a typical consumer. But what's typical changes over time.

...

13:37

Pay your rates "GroovUs Feed Anews"

Here is an article from a Melbourne suburbs newspaper telling people to pay their 'rates' at the Municipal office.


13:01

#SanctionAustralia What Actions can international activists take? RISE: Refugees Survivours and Ex-detainees

1. Contact human rights and civil society groups within your region. Ask them to publicly sanction Australia for torture of refugees.
2. Pressure the UN to sanction Australia for refugee rights violations and from participating in any refugee/humanitarian and human rights decision making process.
3. Consistent presence at Australian embassies carrying Sanction Australia banners visibly!
4. Banner/ brochure Sanction Australia banner drops in busy areas and brochure distribution at any events
5. Presence at sporting and other other events Australia participates in.
6. Boycott any events sponsored by security companies or private firms who ran detention centres in Australia such Serco, Wilson Security, Broadspectrum, Ferrovial Servicios etc.

NOTE:
RISE has to authorize any fundraising events for the #SanctionAustralia Campaign.
Respect eX-detainees running this campaign at RISE. Make sure you acknowledge our labour and leadership

RISE eX-detainee Team.

10:41

AVN Founder and Vaccine-Activist promises to retire if Victorian Minister is vaccinated "IndyWatch Feed National"

Meryl Dorey, past-president and founder of the AVN, Australias national vaccine-safety consumer health lobby group, has called upon Jill Hennessy, Victorias Health Minister, to demonstrate that, There are no risks in vaccinating your children.

Read More

10:13

Wilkie backs push against parliament delay "GroovUs Feed Anews"

Independent MP for Dennison, Andrew Wilkie. Photo AAP

Independent MP for Dennison, Andrew Wilkie. Photo AAP

CANBERRA [AAP]

Crossbench MP Andrew Wilkie says the federal parliament has a moral imperative to sit next week as Turnbull government ministers line up to defend deferring the lower house session.

Labor has drafted a letter petitioning Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull to reverse his decision to postpone the House of Representatives sitting to December 4.

Victorian independent Cathy McGowan has confirmed she will not take part in any protest sitting, but her four crossbench colleagues are expected to co-sign Labors letter.

Their support would mean 73 MPs support the push the same number the government has on the floor of the house with Barnaby Joyce and John Alexander off fighting by-elections.

With numbers being that close surely theres a moral imperative if not a legal imperative on the prime minister agreeing that the parliament would sit next week, Mr Wilkie told ABC Radio.

Leader of the House Christopher Pyne said the delay would give the Senate time to pass the same-sex marriage bill and allow parliament to sort out the dual citizenship mess.

However, the announcement came just hours after Queensland LNP senator Barry OSullivan said up to four coalition MPs were considering breaking coalition ranks to vote for an inquiry into the banks.

Mr Pyne insisted the decision to delay the return of parliament had nothing to do with thwarting Labor or rogue government backbenchers mustering the necessary votes to launch an investigation into the banks.

Theres no motion or bill to establish a banking royal commission either before the Senate or the House of Representatives, he told ABC radio.

Treasurer Scott Morrison also played down the link but Opposition Leader Bill Shorten grabbed it with both hands.

There is no doubt in my mind that one of the reasons why Mr Turnbull has cancelled parliament next week is because he knows a banking royal commission is inevitable, Mr Shorten said.

And he will do everything he can d...

07:35

Brace for impact. Damn the Matrix

This piece is particularly interesting because its from someone who campaigns for the Scottish Greens. Hes also a scientist, so knows whats going on better than most politicians.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

ianbaxter

Ian Baxter

Politics will not save us from abrupt climate change because we dont want to be saved

Forty years ago I was studying for a Physics degree at Edinburgh University. I chose Edinburgh because it offered a course which included Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics, interests which have stayed with me since.

When I came across articles about the Greenhouse Effect, this intrigued me as a scientist, but also worried me as a human being, and although it was only a theory at the time, I felt the implications if true were so severe that at the very least, we should adopt the precautionary principle and take immediate action to prevent it.

It was this that led me to join the Ecology Party in 1979 and since then, politics for me has always been about climate change and the need to address it before it became unstoppable. In the seventies and eighties, the threat of an impending nuclear war was on everyones minds, but here was...

05:00

Traveling Illustrator Captures Londons Historic Pubs as Cut-Out Pen and Ink Drawings "GroovUs Feed Anews"

London Pub Illustrations Maxwell Tilse

The Blackfriar. Blackfriars.
This post may contain affiliate links. If you make a purchase, My Modern Met may earn an affiliate commission. Please read our disclosure for more info.

Earlier this year, we introduced you to London-based illustrator Maxwell Tilse, who combines his love of drawing with his passion for traveling. Originally from Sydney, Australia, the 23-year-old travels Europe, documenting each city he visits with beautifully detailed pen and ink sketches. Now, as he prepares to leave London after living there for two years, he has released a new series of cut-out drawings that depict the citys oldest pubs.

London is a city packed to the brim with historical wonders that are so easy to miss or pass by, unnoticed, says Tilse. From the wedge-shaped Black Friar built in 1875, to the quaint Georgian architecture of the The Bricklayers Arms in Fitzrovia, Tilse captures the essence of Londons most quintessentially English watering holesthe oldest being The Old George, which has been in business since 1713.

Approximately 5cm in height, Tilses little pubs feature charming details, such as stain glass windows, ornamental balconies, and Tudor style chimneys. I do love the mock Tudor architecture that's nestled in between the grand Victorian hotels and galleries, the artist admits. He finishes his process by photographing his work, held up beside the original building.

If you love Tilses work you can purchase prints via his Etsy shop. Keep up to date with Tilses illustrated travel journal on Instagram.

Illustrator Maxwell Tilse Captures Londons oldest pubs in a series of cut-out pen and ink drawings.

...

03:00

Black Death Warning: The Plague Is Impossible To Eradicate "IndyWatch Feed Survival"

Face masks are placed on children in Antananarivo, Madagascar (AP Photo/Alexander JOE)

Face masks are placed on children in Antananarivo, Madagascar (AP Photo/Alexander JOE)

An expert is warning the plague that has sickened over 2000 people in Madagascar since August is impossible to eradicate. Even though the number of those infected has dropped in recent weeks, the plague will never truly be gone.

Its not possible to eradicate plague, as it is widespread in wildlife rodents outside the sphere of human influence, Cheng wrote on The ConversationOutbreaks, generally, are managed reactively by firefighting teams, deployed to clear houses of fleas, identify and treat cases and give pre-emptive treatment to contacts at risk. A more preventative approach, such as the identification of areas at risk using climate models and animal surveys to focus flea and rat control efforts, would be better, he said. But, this requires a better understanding of transmission pathways in each region where disease persists.

The best way to stop the plague spreading was to focus on flea and rat control in the most at-risk areas, he said. Chengs comments came after at least 171 people died in Madagascar over an outbreak of plague. Nine countries were urged by the World Health Organisation (WHO) to prepare for a black death attack, at the end of October.

Its been reported that plague has been transmitted to humans by camels, goats, prairie dogs, rock squirrels and guinea pigs since the 1960s. There are only a few remaining hotspots for plague in th...

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Monday, 20 November

22:14

Friends of Leadbeaters Possum Inc v VicForests November 17 2017 Friends of Leadbeater's Possum

The Possums Case

November 17 2017 Summary

Friends of Leadbeaters Possum Inc. v VicForests challenges whether the native forest logging industry can be held to account for its impact on federally listed species, when logging has not been conducted in accordance with the 20-year old Regional Forest Agreement (RFA) regime.

20 year Regional Forest Agreements across Australia

The case concerns the magnificent forests of Victorias Central Highlands which are home to the critically endangered Leadbeaters Possum and the Greater Glider, recently listed as vulnerable. It could have implications for other areas. At stake is native forest habitat on public land that is home to iconic wildlife.

Logging in public native forests is exempt from our national threatened species protection law, the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act, provided that the logging is carried out in accordance with an RFA, a commonwealth-state agreement. The RFA requires a performance review every five years.

We allege that failure to complete the required five-year reviews on time or at all, means that logging in certain areas which significantly impacts the Leadbeaters Possum and Greater Glider has not been and will not be in accordance with the RFA, and so is not exempt from the assessment and approval requirements of the EPBC Act that apply to such actions.

The Central Highlands RFA was signed on 27 March 1998 and the first 5-year review was due by 2003. However, the State and Federal governments say that they have only done one review, which they say looked at the period up to 2009 and concluded in 2015.

The first hearing in the case was held on Friday, 17th November before Justice Mortimer of the Federal Court.

Environmental Justic Australia

The outcome of Fridays hearing was orders from the Court for a hearing of a separate question relating to whether logging in the areas named in FLbPs claim which significantly impacts threatened species has not and will not be conducted in accordance with the RFA, and so is not exempt from the requirements of the EPBC Act, due to the failure to conduct the mandated 5 yearly reviews (the full text of the separate question can be read in the orders from Justice Mortimer see the link belo...

21:58

Financially stressed? Please don't blame high prices "GroovUs Feed Anews"

When Tony Abbott first stood for prime minister, he complained about the price of bread.

He told the leaders debate it had shot up 12 per cent. It hadn't. The Bureau of Statistics found it hadn't increased at all it had been stuck for a year at $3.88.

Head to Woolworths online today and you'll see a variety of prices, for different kinds of loaves. I've averaged them. Today's price is $3.55.

We never seem to notice the prices that are going down, or at least we pay far less attention to them than the prices that are going up (or that we imagine are going up).

The inflation rate is 1.8 per cent. But when asked by the Melbourne Institute what we think it is, we typically say 5 to 6 per cent.

The Bureau of Statistics calculates the rate by going into shops and entering into scanners the prices of around 1000 items. It does it over and over again, all over each of Australia's eight capital cities. These days it augments those readings with scanner data from supermarkets and the prices advertised on websites.

But it gets it wrong. And not in the direction you would expect.

It systematically overestimates the inflation rate because it systematically underestimates our canniness.

Here's how it would work with two brands of baked beans. To start with they might each sell for the same price, and we might buy the same amount of each. Five years later the price of one brand might be 20 per cent higher and the other 5 per cent higher. The Bureau will record an average price increase of around 10 per cent. But the cost to us won't have increased that much. Over time, we will have shifted our purchases to the brand which has increased more slowly, by 5 per cent.

We do it with everything, switching between brands and between products in order to save money. It's how we shop.

It is why every few years the consumer price index gets seriously out of whack and needs to be recalibrated. The Bureau has just done it, re-surveying how we spend our money and readjusting the index to reflect updated spen...

19:46

Naarm / Melbourne, so-called Australia: Serco Compound Attacked in Solidarity with Refugees in Detention "IndyWatch Feed National"

serco

Received on 20.11.17:

19.11.17: Tonight, a group of people in Naarm / Melbourne, responding to the call out for 8 Days of Solidarity for Refugees, undertook an action targeting Serco. Serco is a multinational corporation which is directly responsible for the inhumane incarceration conditions faced by refugees, asylum seekers, and detainees, in so-called Australia. Serco is also a major player in the international privatised prison complex.

The group gained access to a central Naarm / Melbourne, Serco compound and immobilised 7 vehicles. The group also left spray-painted messages on Serco compound property, including vehicles, reading Serco Psycho Scum, Serco, profiting from refugee detention- this is war, and Serco profits from misery, we hold YOU responsible.

Deaths in Detention Vengeance and Accountability Crew


...

18:04

Big upset for Australias major parties, as Aboriginal Green candidate wins inner-city by-election "GroovUs Feed Anews"

Northcote by-election:  Greens win inner-city seat, Thorpe to become first female Aboriginal MP, By Richard Willingham, Sunday 19 November 2017
www.abc.net.au/news/2017-11-18/greens-win-northcote-by-election/9164644 The Greens Lidia Thorpe will become the first Aboriginal woman in Victorias Parliament,
defeating Labors Clare Burns on the back of a campaign that included a
pitch to voters that they could make history while not toppling a progressive government.

It is the first time Labor has lost a Victorian by-election since 1948.


17:50

Surge in wind farms in Australia, drop in complaints about them "GroovUs Feed Anews"

Desultory: Wind farm complaints arent keeping up with surging industry, The Age, Peter Hannam, 19 Nov 17,  The surge in new wind farm developments has failed to produce an upswing in complaints, with just nine of the 79 projects operating in Australia receiving any formal objections, Andrew Dyer, the National Wind Farm Commissioner, has said.

As of the end of October, the commission had received 54 complaints, for existing projects, with all but two resolved. Four people had relocated as part of the resolution process.

There are no complaints for recently completed wind farms, Mr Dyer told Fairfax Media.

Victorian wind farms have attracted the bulk of objections, accounting for 31 of the 54, while SA and NSW had 16 and seven complaints, respectively. Operating wind farms in other states have not triggered any complaints, Mr Dyer said.

The National Wind Farm Commissioners three-year term  which began in late 2015 with $2 million funding  followed a Senate inquiry prompted in part by efforts of a few anti-wind turbine groups.

Fears by supporters of renewable energy that the commission may have spurred an uptick in opposition to wind farms have largely been allayed, with the role now seen as helping developers understand and respond better to...

17:43

Zero G - 20 November 2017 Episode 1160 "GroovUs Feed Apodcasts"

ZERO-G #1160

Title: Punishing Justice

Podcast Title:  Steppenpod 1160

Science Fiction, Fantasy and Historical Radio with Rob Jan & Megan McKeough. This week: we hit the PUNISHER (and watch him get hit); and join the JUSTICE LEAGUE.

For playlists, show notes, and news see the 3RRR website at:

http://www.rrr.org.au/program/zero-g/playlists

Follow @zerogrobjan on Twitter and Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/ZeroGRadio

Zero G broadcasts live from Melbourne Australia on Mondays at 1pm AEST

15:55

Kathy Jackson to stand trial in the Victorian County Court on 166 theft and fraud charges "IndyWatch Feed National"

Kathy Jackson today appeared before the Melbourne Magistrates' Court for a committal hearing of 166 fraud and theft charges. A committal in Victoria's legal system is heard before a Magistrate who decides whether the prosecution has established a prima facie case against the defendant - in other words, would a...

14:40

MEDIA RELEASE 19/11 | URGENT SURGERY NEEDED FOR BRAIN-INJURED REFUGEE ON NAURU Refugee Action Collective (Vic)

Refugee Action Coalition MEDIA RELEASE URGENT SURGERY NEEDED FOR BRAIN-INJURED REFUGEE ON NAURU A 28 year-old Rohingyan refugee injured in a motorbike accident on Nauru this morning around 7.00am has been unconscious in the RON hospital since this afternoon (Saturday 18 November). The accident between two motorbikes, happened on the Fly Camp Rd, the same(...)

14:39

MEDIA RELEASE 17/11 | EMERGENCY RALLY: STILL NO SAFE SETTLEMENT AS MANUS DEFIES THE SIEGE Refugee Action Collective (Vic)

Refugee Action Coalition MEDIA RELEASE EMERGENCY RALLY: STILL NO SAFE SETTLEMENT AS MANUS DEFIES THE SIEGE Despite constant claims from the Prime Minister and Immigration Minister that new relocation areas are safe and ready, photos from West Lorengau on Manus Island show that the area is still a construction site. Duttons claim that he wants(...)

13:19

Thursday & Quicksand "GroovUs Feed Anews"

Post-hardcore pioneers, THURSDAY announce theyre coming out of retirement with their first run of shows in Australia since 2012. Officially reforming in 2016, theyll bring the tour to Sydney, Brisbane, Melbourne and Adelaide in March 2018. Joining them on all dates is influential New York City post-hardcore legends, QUICKSAND.

Tickets for all shows go on sale at 12pm this Friday, October 13.

My Live Nation members can secure tickets first during the exclusive pre-sale beginning tomorrow at 10am, October 11.

For complete tour and ticketing details, visit: livenation.com.au.

Revered for their anguished lyrics, chiming guitars and explosive stage presence, Thursday have been a house-hold name among punk and rock fans since their debut release, Waiting, 18 years ago. Coming out of New Jersey in 1999 at the precipice of the post-punk movement, Thursday were quick to gain the attention of fans and labels with their raw, emotive sound. However, it wasnt until their 2001 album, Full Collapse, that they fully defined a genre.

Over the course of their active years, Thursday produced six eclectic albums. None were more representative of their distinctive sound than 2003s War All The Time. Armed with the backing of major label, Island Records, the album continued to elevate them as one of the most complex and exciting bands of the decade. After pioneering the post-hardcore genre, the band officially disbanded in 2013.

Emerging from the New York City hardcore scene of the 90s, QUICKSAND delivered a masterclass over two albums on what would be a stylistic blueprint for many bands to follow. They will release Interiors this November, which many attribute as their best album to date. It arrives deliberately unannounced, two decades after the pioneering post-hardcore quartets last album. Made completely on the bands own terms, Interiors has a power, strength and subtlety that will likely stun you. There are no wasted notes, no flab, and no excess whatsoever. It is absolutely perfect.

Catch these two genre-defining acts together this March!.......................

09:30

This Way North Announce National Tour Dates "GroovUs Feed Anews"

Image Courtesy of This Way North Melbourne based alt-folk-rock duo This Way North will be spending the rest of the year running around the country with the announcement of a national tour. The tour is accompanied by the bands latest single Make It Work, a lo-fi piece of crunch, psych goodness. Check out the full []

09:28

Farmers say innovation the only antidote to new climate reality "GroovUs Feed Anews"

In this report, Derrick Krusch (The Citizen 15 November 2017) shows that there are farmers who are working hard to farm in more sustainable ways, by operating much more in tune with the Australian environment, when in the past this was often not the case. Change has become even more important in the light of changing weather patterns. While this report concerns the situation in Victorias north western grain belt, the lesson is applicable nationally.

Standing in a chickpea field on the sprawling plains of Victorias Wimmera district, 38-year-old third-generation farmer David Jochinke picks up a clump of dry soil before crushing it into dust, symbolic of an extreme dry spell that has brought back terrible recent memories.

Mr Jochinke, whose 2200-hectare broadacre farm lies just north of Horsham, says he has only seen three good years of rain since taking over in the late 1990s.

This makes him anxious, especially as many farmers in his region are still carrying debt from the so-called Millennium Drought, which gripped the state for more than a decade until 2009, causing widespread crop failures and livestock losses.

The politically active Mr Jochinke, who sits on the board of the National Farmers Federation and lobbies hard for families on the land, says he has revolutionised the way he farms in order to alleviate the effects of drought in fact, to save his livelihood.

Weve tried different crops, weve tried different farming systems, weve tried different technologies, he says. Whether youre a climate change sceptic or not it doesnt really matter in my book, because weve all changed how we farm to adapt.

Drought has been an ever-present threat for farmers since European settlement, but now climate experts are cautioning that harsh dry conditions are the new norm, not the exception. Increasingly, farmers are opening to new strategies necessary to protect themselves from this risk while increasing productivity and profitability. Crop diversification, smarter planting, risk information and social media are all playing a role in insulating farmers against the ravages of drought.

Underscoring the message was the hottest October on record, which scorched crops throughout the northwest of the state ahead of this months harvest, and led to predictions that the extended dry could slash more than 1 million tonnes from Victorias grain harvest.

In response, the State Government announced $30 million in loans for farmers to help cover financial losses, a move welcomed by Victorian Farmers Federation president Peter Tuohey. A significant proportion of Victoria has fallen within a one-in-10 or one-in-20 year rainfall deficiency, so these....

09:01

The Greens win in Northcote brings important consequences "GroovUs Feed Anews"

Contributed by Jim Hayes

The victory by Greens Candidate Linda Thorpe in the Northcote by-election is important, not so much because the win went to the Greens, or even by making history with the first indigenous woman elected into Victorias parliament, as much as because this has provided a litmus test, for the level of disenchantment that is rising around Australia.

As well as in the immediate sense, this has longer-term implications for the whole nation.

Closer to home, Victorias Andrews Labor government faces an election next year. In Northcote and other inner Melbourne electorates, Labor has been seeing the erosion of its heartland over some years. But rather than going to the Coalition, the drift is mainly towards the Greens.Labour has to contend with this reality. It is in the inner suburbs, where this is most likely to be at this time, converted into seats.

As well as the big picture, there are local issues. Sometimes too much weight is given to gentrification, that is, the coming in of a more professional, educated and better heeled population. There is some of this. But changing political attitudes are also being seen among Labors traditional working class heartland.

The Andrews Government is  vulnerable because to its intention to turn over public housing land to a mix of public, broader social and private housing, increasingly seen as privatisation through the back door.

Inner Melbourne faces a housing affordability crisis, where average homes are now, routinely priced on the wrong side of $1 million. People are hurting. Although there is a promise for more resources to be committed in this direction, it is not enough to turn the tide.

Another key local issue is the escalating traffic congestion that is turning the city into a commuting nightmare. There is more public transport. The down side is that the growth has not been enough to

meet the pace of increasing demand and trains and trams have become overcrowded.

The Coalition parties have nothing to smile about. Their position is worse. The biggest burden they have in Victoria is the unpopular Turnbull government in Canberra. Even without this, they are a non-show in Melbournes inner suburbs.

The disenchanted are turning away from traditional political institutions and the two party system, although this takes different forms in different places. Northcote is no exception.

In the century of its existence, the seat has always been held by Labor. Once by a big margin. In recent years this has dwindled, and it has now gone.

In the short-term, Labor faces a serious threat in Richmond and Brunswick and this has the potential of eroding the governments majority and putting the Greens in a bargaining po...

08:40

The car in front is an import "GroovUs Feed Anews"

Shuttered

Automotive production continues to plummet, with annual volumes nearly 50 per cent below their December 2010 level, and falling fast, so the new car you buy next year will likely be made somewhere else. 


The Department of Employment projected that the factory closures at Elizabeth in Adelaide (Holden) and Altona in Melbourne (Toyota) could cost 27,500 jobs over the years ahead, leading some commentators to predict the end of days for Australia.

Indeed, some gloomy reports even speculated that the closures could snowball into hundreds of thousands of jobs losses, which always seemed a bit far-fetched given that the shutdowns have been discussed for years.

It was wise to be prudent and wait for the halting of operations to pass, which has now occurred, but if there were to be any earth-shaking initial impacts then they weren't yet in evidence in the October 2017 employment figures.

In the event, total employment exploded +355,700 higher over the year to October, sending the unemployment rate careering to a 4 low, and with the ABS also now putting job openings at the highest level on record

Furthermore, the more timely SEEK job advertisements figures showed openings tearing 25 per cent higher in South Australia and 18 per cent higher in Victoria, so it's probably....

07:15

Misrepresentation, lies, deception and fraud ... "GroovUs Feed Anews"

Despite the expense neither the Department nor their collaborators the Invasive Animals CRC were able to confirm the existence of any live foxes in Tasmania. Beginning in 2014 independent peer-reviewed research demonstrated that the physical evidence gathered in Tasmania was unsound and to date neither organisation has chosen to vouch for their data or justify the expenditure of tens of millions of taxpayer dollars trying to eradicate an animal they could not locate Premier Bacon literally head-hunted journalists he wanted from the local newspapers, commercial TV and the ABC and paid them far more than they could ever earn in the private sector. In this way local media was tamed to play along with Government policy. Twenty years on and arguably there are more journalists now employed inside government to fend off the public interest than exist outside to defend it. Moulding public perception is now a bog-standard skill of government with little regard for truth Jack Jolly in Comments: Deception is the way this is done. Thats how High Rise Harry gets to turn Sydney and Melbourne into Hong Kong. Hes given a licence by the state government to do so, and to hell with what the people who live there want. Did anyone ask the people of Sydney and Melbourne? Nope. Oddly, governing the state would be a hell of a lot easier if it was done on the basis of finding out what the public wanted done and what public values require If you can chase something that does not exist for 15 years and spend $50 million on it, then claim that it has been an outstanding success, then there are no limits to the bullshit you will project. Anything is possible. Isnt that the lesson of the fox fiasco - that government has no shame and no fear of the public whatsoever? They can look us in the eye and lie time and time again. There are no consequences David Obendorf in Comments: Perhaps it is a bitter pill. That this expensive eradication program was based on some unconscionable lying and the use of imported hoaxed evidence calculated to deceive. The presentation of false, unsubstantiated allegations to Tasmania Police was bad enough, but lying to a fox ecologist compounds the offence. To falsify physical evidence using dead fox exhibits adds to the gravity Jack in Comments: Of course, the government in the lower house can always cancel parliament when things get too hot as Do-Nothing Malcolm (Member for Goldman Sachs) has just done: HERE

04:15

Misrepresentation, lies, deception and fraud "GroovUs Feed Anews"

Despite the expense neither the Department nor their collaborators the Invasive Animals CRC were able to confirm the existence of any live foxes in Tasmania. Beginning in 2014 independent peer-reviewed research demonstrated that the physical evidence gathered in Tasmania was unsound and to date neither organisation has chosen to vouch for their data or justify the expenditure of tens of millions of taxpayer dollars trying to eradicate an animal they could not locate Premier Bacon literally head-hunted journalists he wanted from the local newspapers, commercial TV and the ABC and paid them far more than they could ever earn in the private sector. In this way local media was tamed to play along with Government policy. Twenty years on and arguably there are more journalists now employed inside government to fend off the public interest than exist outside to defend it. Moulding public perception is now a bog-standard skill of government with little regard for truth Jack Jolly in Comments: Deception is the way this is done. Thats how High Rise Harry gets to turn Sydney and Melbourne into Hong Kong. Hes given a licence by the state government to do so, and to hell with what the people who live there want. Did anyone ask the people of Sydney and Melbourne? Nope. Oddly, governing the state would be a hell of a lot easier if it was done on the basis of finding out what the public wanted done and what public values require If you can chase something that does not exist for 15 years and spend $50 million on it, then claim that it has been an outstanding success, then there are no limits to the bullshit you will project. Anything is possible. Isnt that the lesson of the fox fiasco - that government has no shame and no fear of the public whatsoever? They can look us in the eye and lie time and time again. There are no consequences David Obendorf in Comments: Perhaps it is a bitter pill. That this expensive eradication program was based on some unconscionable lying and the use of imported hoaxed evidence calculated to deceive. The presentation of false, unsubstantiated allegations to Tasmania Police was bad enough, but lying to a fox ecologist compounds the offence. To falsify physical evidence using dead fox exhibits adds to the gravity

Sunday, 19 November

19:30

Open-Minded/Creative People Live In A Completely Different Reality, According to Study "GroovUs Feed Anews"

Sure, there is obviously a big difference between close-minded people and open-minded people, right? But how deep does this difference run exactly?

For this study, one hundred and twenty-three people of different backgrounds were examined thoroughly. They were tested for open-mindedness which was done through five different categories. That being conscientiousness, extroversion, agreeableness, neuroticism, and the ability to maintain an open mind in general. After all of this, they then tested individuals for a phenomenon known as binocular rivalry which is something that occurs when each eye is shown a different image (one red and one green). Most people switch back and forth between the two images but some people merge the two into a red-green patch.

It was found that those who saw both images together were the ones who had also scored higher on the openness test in general. This led the researchers to theorize that open-minded people seem to create new mental routes in their minds and attain higher planes of thought. They also noted open-minded people were more creative thus meaning creative people see the world differently as well.

This seems to match up with several previous studies that suggested open people experienced things differently than most people. ScienceDirect says as follows on the study:

For instance, openness predicts performance on divergent thinking tasks (Kaufman et al., 2016; Silvia et al., 2008), which require one to identify multiple diverse uses for ordinary objects. For open people this seems to happen effortlessly, suggesting a more flexible way of combining information, perhaps even at low-levels of perceptual processing. For example, people high in openness display reductions in latent inhibition (i.e., attenuated attentional processing following repeated stimulus exposure) suggesting individual differences in preconscious attentional mechanisms (Peterson & Carson, 1999; Peterson, Smith, & Carson, 2002). Latent inhibition reflects an adaptive attentional gating system for screening out irrelevant information, but for open people this system appears to be more flexible, resulting in the continued processing of stimuli from which the average individual has disengaged. However, we are aware of no previous research examining whether openness relates to how...

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